#TuesdayBookBlog ‘The Other People’ by @CJTudor #Suspense @Audible #BookReview

Last year I read and reviewed The Taking of Annie Thorne, an engaging and bloodcurdling thriller. by C. J. Tudor. I was really looking forward to her most recent thriller, The Other People, published last month, and I was not disappointed. So, today I’d like to tell you about her newest chilling and suspenseful mystery, not for the faint hearted!

The Other People audiobook cover art

From the Blurb

Driving home one night,  Gabe sees a little girl’s face appear in the rear window. It’s his five-year-old daughter, Izzy.

He never sees her again.

Three years later, Gabe spends his days and nights travelling up and down the motorway, searching for the car that took his daughter, refusing to give up hope, even though most people believe that Izzy is dead.

Fran and her daughter, Alice, also put in a lot of miles on the motorway. Not searching. But running. Trying to keep one step ahead of the people who want to hurt them.

Because Fran knows the truth. She knows what really happened to Gabe’s daughter. She knows who is responsible. And she knows what they will do if they ever catch up with her and Alice . .

****

My Review

The Other People is a brilliantly executed and chilling thriller by C. J. Tudor.

Gabe’s wife and his daughter, Izzy, were murdered and buried, but he is convinced his daughter is alive, because he believes he saw her in someone’s car on the motorway, after she had supposedly been murdered. Nobody believes him, especially not the police or his wife’s parents, who are convinced he has lost his mind, but has he?

Gabe spends the following three years travelling up and down the motorway, looking for the car and Izzy.

The first half of the novel is slower, as all the players, who seem unrelated, are introduced. At first, I was wondering where the story was going, but it soon picks up, as Gabe discovers the lies and complex web he’s entangled in. Almost all the characters are hiding secrets and telling lies, and others are downright evil, but Gabe’s shocking past is the central piece of the puzzle.

The second half is fast paced and suspenseful and well worth the slow start, as everything starts to fall into place, but beware, there are more sinister characters and surprising events ahead. When I thought I knew where the story was going, there was another unexpected twist.

Especially for anyone who enjoys reading suspenseful thrillers with some chilling events and disquieting characters, and plenty of unnerving twists and turns.

I listened to the audiobook on Audible. Richard Armitage’s reading is brilliant, as always.

Audible link to The Other People

****

C. J. Tudor

C. J. Tudor was born in Salisbury and grew up in Nottingham, where she still lives with her partner and young daughter.

Follow her on twitter.

Tuesday

Photo taken on my morning walk, in Córdoba, 4th February, 2020

#TuesdayBookBlog #BookReview ‘The Taking of Annie Thorne’ by C J Tudor @cjtudor #Audible

I recently finished reading ‘The Taking of Annie Thorne’ a chilling thriller by C J Tudor, which was recommended by Linda Hill, book reviewer extraordinaire. Visit Linda’s blog for fabulous book reviews, author interviews and lots of other bookish posts!

BLURB

One night, Annie went missing.

Disappeared from her own bed. There were searches, appeals. Everyone thought the worst.

And then, after 48 hours, she came back.

But she couldn’t, or wouldn’t, say what had happened to her.

Something happened to my sister. I can’t explain what.

I just know that when she came back, she wasn’t the same.

She wasn’t my Annie.

I didn’t want to admit, even to myself, that sometimes I was scared to death of my own little sister.

****

My Review

The Taking of Annie Thorne is a brilliant thriller and a compelling read. I started it on Friday evening and finished it on Saturday after lunch.

It’s difficult to write a review without giving anything away. There are plenty of twists and turns, and a few red herrings, too! Most characters are not who they seem to be.

The beginning is intriguing as the story unfolds. The events are mostly told from Joe Thorne’s first person point of view, in the present tense, with some flashbacks to his childhood and his sister’s disappearance.

Joe is a flawed, but likeable character. I’m not sure why, because he’s done some unlikable things! I appreciate his fierce honesty as he grapples with his psychological issues and moral dilemmas. He knows he’s the main actor in a tragedy, yet in spite of the hopelessness of his situation, he’s struggling to make amends, help others and be a better person. He’s also a genuinely good teacher, concerned with his students’ wellbeing.

Joe does a lot of lying, however, he’s honest with himself and consequently the reader. Unfortunately, Joe doesn’t know all the truth himself, so he occasionally misleads us, especially at the beginning.

Joe and the reader will gradually discover what happened to his sister, who wrote the anonymous email asking him to return, and who is responsible for what has happened to other children in Arnhill.

The atmosphere is chilling and sinister, with some scary scenes, which aren’t too gory, except for the creepy beetles, which I can’t stand.

The last third, where the whole plot is resolved, is fast paced, surprising and satisfactory. Although there are some supernatural elements in the story, the storyline and ending are believably wrapped up.

I’d recommend this novel especially for readers who enjoy engaging and bloodcurdling thrillers.

By the way, I thoroughly enjoyed Richard Armitage’s reading on Audible.

Amazon Author Page with book links