#TuesdayBookBlog ‘The Other People’ by @CJTudor #Suspense @Audible #BookReview

Last year I read and reviewed The Taking of Annie Thorne, an engaging and bloodcurdling thriller. by C. J. Tudor. I was really looking forward to her most recent thriller, The Other People, published last month, and I was not disappointed. So, today I’d like to tell you about her newest chilling and suspenseful mystery, not for the faint hearted!

The Other People audiobook cover art

From the Blurb

Driving home one night,  Gabe sees a little girl’s face appear in the rear window. It’s his five-year-old daughter, Izzy.

He never sees her again.

Three years later, Gabe spends his days and nights travelling up and down the motorway, searching for the car that took his daughter, refusing to give up hope, even though most people believe that Izzy is dead.

Fran and her daughter, Alice, also put in a lot of miles on the motorway. Not searching. But running. Trying to keep one step ahead of the people who want to hurt them.

Because Fran knows the truth. She knows what really happened to Gabe’s daughter. She knows who is responsible. And she knows what they will do if they ever catch up with her and Alice . .

****

My Review

The Other People is a brilliantly executed and chilling thriller by C. J. Tudor.

Gabe’s wife and his daughter, Izzy, were murdered and buried, but he is convinced his daughter is alive, because he believes he saw her in someone’s car on the motorway, after she had supposedly been murdered. Nobody believes him, especially not the police or his wife’s parents, who are convinced he has lost his mind, but has he?

Gabe spends the following three years travelling up and down the motorway, looking for the car and Izzy.

The first half of the novel is slower, as all the players, who seem unrelated, are introduced. At first, I was wondering where the story was going, but it soon picks up, as Gabe discovers the lies and complex web he’s entangled in. Almost all the characters are hiding secrets and telling lies, and others are downright evil, but Gabe’s shocking past is the central piece of the puzzle.

The second half is fast paced and suspenseful and well worth the slow start, as everything starts to fall into place, but beware, there are more sinister characters and surprising events ahead. When I thought I knew where the story was going, there was another unexpected twist.

Especially for anyone who enjoys reading suspenseful thrillers with some chilling events and disquieting characters, and plenty of unnerving twists and turns.

I listened to the audiobook on Audible. Richard Armitage’s reading is brilliant, as always.

Audible link to The Other People

****

C. J. Tudor

C. J. Tudor was born in Salisbury and grew up in Nottingham, where she still lives with her partner and young daughter.

Follow her on twitter.

Tuesday

Photo taken on my morning walk, in Córdoba, 4th February, 2020

#TuesdayBookBlog #BookReview ‘The Tattooist of Auschwitz’ by Heather Morris @Audible

I’d heard about this novel when it first came out, but it was after recently listening to an interview by Richard Armitage, who is the narrator on Audible, that I decided to purchase it with my monthly credit, and I’m so glad I did. The Tattooist of Auschwitz is more than a book, it’s an emotional experience.

BLURB

In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Tätowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners.

Imprisoned for over two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarism—but also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive.

One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her.

A vivid, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful re-creation of Lale Sokolov’s experiences as the man who tattooed the arms of thousands of prisoners with what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust, The Tattooist of Auschwitz is also a testament to the endurance of love and humanity under the darkest possible conditions.

 

****

My Review

The Tattooist of Auschwitz is one of the most emotional love stories I’ve ever read. It’s about Lale and Gita, both from Bratislava, who meet and fall in love in a concentration camp in Poland.

It’s the story of Lale’s resourcefulness, strength, tenacity, goodness and love for Gita, during the three years they spent in the camp, and how he found her again when they lost touch after leaving Auschwitz.

It’s also about the horrors of war, the cruelty humans are capable of, and the need to take risks and compromise in order to survive.

The struggle for survival in extreme situations is complex and unimaginable for those who have never experienced it. The emotional and psychological cost of that survival is just as unimaginably distressing, and also comes across in the narrative. 

Yet the end of the novel, the epilogue and their son’s testimony, makes it ultimately an uplifting novel, because there is more gratitude and faith in the future than bitterness or desire for vengeance about the past.

In the end it’s not a novel about war or evil, it’s about the power of love.

Did I tell you I listened to the audio version brilliantly read by Richard Armitage?

US Buy link

UK Buy link

Read more of my #TuesdayBookBlog reviews.