#ThursdayDoors Temporary Doors May Fair #Cordoba, #Spain

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then  linking up on Norm’s blog here.

May is a very festive and merry month in Cordoba, Andalusia, where I live. At the moment the city is celebrating the Annual May Fair.

All of the doors are temporary, mostly plywood doors, highly decorated, although others, at least look like real doors, but next Monday, they’ll all be dismantled until next year.

The main door into the Fair Ground is a reproduction of the Mosque-Cathedral, an emblematic, historic moment in Cordoba.

These three doors lead to three of the temporary bars built for the occasion.

The fairgoers walk along the makeshift streets, some wear typical gipsy dresses and dance ‘Sevillanas’, most people pop into the temporary bars to eat tapas, drink white wine and dance to whatever lively music is playing.

There are some more photos in my previous post.

More information about the May Fair in Cordoba here.

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#ThursdayDoors ‘No Intruders’ #Haiku #Spain

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature, hosted by Norm 2.0 allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. 

These are some of the gates I saw on a recent walk. It’s along a street called Avenida del Brillante, in Cordoba, Spain, which could be translated as Diamond Avenue. It was given the name because many wealthy jewellers used to live here. I’m not sure if the owners are still jewellers, but the houses are still grand!

The gates are definitely meant to keep intruders out, wouldn’t you say? But some things find their way inside despite the gates…

No Intruders

Iron bars, tall gates

Guard homes, castles, and kingdoms.

Saucy wind floats in.

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Would you like to join in and show us some doors or see pictures of other doors? inlinkz

#ThursdayDoors Julio Romero de Torres Museum #Cordoba, #Spain

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature, hosted by Norm 2.0 allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. 

Would you like to follow me inside the Julio Romero de Torres Museum?

This is the main door to the museum, which was also the house in which the painter lived. Unfortunately, no photos are allowed inside the building.

It’s one of the typical houses found in the Old Town, specifically in the Jewish Quarter. It’s a small museum with six large rooms of exhibits on three floors. There’s an open air patio in the centre with orange trees and ceramic tiles.

Here is Julio Romero de Torres (1874-1930), painting in his patio.

He painted mainly dark haired and olive-skinned women, often with either sorrowful or defiant expressions.

This is one of his most famous paintings ‘La Chiquita Piconera’  ‘The Little Coal Girl’.

This painting is called ‘Alegrías’. It depicts a group of cheerful women dancing a flamenco dance called ‘Alegrias’, which also means happiness.

And here we have the other side of the coin ‘¡Mira qué bonita era!’ or ‘Look how beautiful she was!’

You can take a virtual tour of the museum here, enjoy!

 

 

#ThursdayDoors The Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba, Spain. Part I

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon and linking up on Norm’s blog here.

The main door of the outer walls of the Mosque. called La Puerta del Perdón, or the Door of Forgiveness.

There was originally a Visigothic Christian Basilica of Saint Vincent, on this site. Some remains are preserved inside the Mosque.  After the Muslim invasion of Spain, the church was divided into Muslim and Christian halves from 711 – 784, when Abd al-Rahman I, bought it from the Christians, demolished the original church and started building the the Great Mosque of Cordoba.

The Mosque has since undergone numerous extensions until 1236, when the building was repossessed by the Christians and used as a Catholic place of worship. The Christian conversion included the insertion of a Cathedral within the mosque in the 16th century.

More information about the Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba here.

A close up of the door knockers.

The Belfry Tower, above the main door, was a Christian addition in the 13th century.

Another view of the belfry Tower of the Mosque-Cathedral taken from a nearby street.

It’s a fascinating place. It’s like looking at hundreds of years of history, offering different and complementing ideas of architecture, art, beauty and religious worship in one building.

The Mosque-Cathedral has many more doors on the outer walls and inside. I’ll be showing you others in the coming Thursdays.

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#ThursdayDoors ‘Patios’ Courtyards in Cordoba

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon and linking up on Norm’s blog here.

 

There’s a yearly Festivity in Cordoba, the town where I live, called the ‘Patios’ or Courtyard Festival. Families who live in traditional houses in the Old Town with central courtyards, open their homes so that tourists and visitors can look inside and enjoy their potted plants, flowers, wells, whitewashed walls and stone, cobbled, or ceramic floors. Here are a few I visited this week.

The front door is usually made of cast iron as you can see above.

Inside the iron gate is the entry and beyond the patio. Notice the columns on either side. I’m not an expert, so I can’t guarantee it, but many of the houses have ‘real’ Roman pillars, perhaps this is one of them…

Cordoba was first settled by the Romans, who named it Corduba, about a century BC. It is not surprising that these houses resemble Roman houses, Domus, which were built in this quarter, over 2,000 years ago. The style, with the central courtyard and rooms built around it has prevailed, along with the cobbled streets, mosaics and tiles.

Green is a popular colour for doors.

Most doors are made of wood and painted brown.

The plants and flowers in the patio are valued for their beauty and the shade they provide. It’s very hot in Cordoba!

Narrow double doors are popular.

This smaller patio door, probably leads to a cellar or store room.

Most houses have two floors. Would you like to walk upstairs to the top floor gallery and see some more doors?

There are many double glass doors.

If you’re wondering how the plants are watered, it’s with a small watering can on the end of a long pole as you can see here. Notice the cobbled floor in the patio. It’s hundreds pf years old!

 

This is a view of one of the streets in the Old town, where you can visit the patios I’ve shown you.

Here I am having fun visiting the Patios with my daughter.

I hope you enjoyed the doors of the patios in Cordoba!

More about the Patios, which are in the list of Unesco’s Intangible Heritage of Humanity sites,

I’m not really sure what that means, but they are a beautiful sight.

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#ThursdayDoors May Crosses and Doors in Cordoba, Spain

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon and linking up on Norm’s blog here.

May is a very festive and merry month in Cordoba, Andalusia, where I live. Last weekend the city celebrated the Festival of the May Crosses.

Crosses decorated with spring flowers are set up around the city, usually near churches, as we can see in this church door in the background.

Some of the doors are built especially for the cross, as in this case. After the three-day festival it is removed, along with the wall and the potted plants.

Although the crosses are admired for their beauty, there’s always a stand with some wine, beer and tapas nearby to celebrate the festivity, as you can see on the left of the cross.

More information about the May festivities in Cordoba here.

Next week I’ll show you some of the doors to the world-famous Patios Festival, which is a competition for the prettiest courtyard in the city. 

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#ThursdayDoors Gates Seen in Cordoba

I live in Cordoba, Spain, which is surrounded by hills, called Sierra Morena. Towards the north of the city, away from the historic Old Town and the busy modern town centre lies a residential area, where I often go for long sunny walks. These photos of some gates of the villas I walk past were taken a few days ago. Hope you like them! Don’t forget to check other doors on Norm’s Blog in this weekly challenge, or join in with your own doors!

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